04 Mar

5 Ethical Brands That Celebrate All Women

Fashion and International Women’s Day have always had a connection. The idea for IWD was born in 1909 when women gathered in New York City to honour garment workers who had gone on strike over pay and conditions one year earlier.

Now, more than a century later, International Women’s Day is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of woman and call for equality and empowerment – and fashion has a role to play here too.

We know that Fast Fashion Is A Feminist Issue, and the empowerment of female garment workers is still a key concern for the industry. But what about the brands themselves? What are they doing to celebrate, uplift and empower women from all walks of life?

While there’s still some work to be done, ‘woke’ fashion is now much more than just a passing trend. Diversity and representation are now mainstream ideas. Some examples of the fashion world embracing diversity, include 97-year-old style icon Iris Apfel recently signing a new modelling contract and cancer survivor and amputee Mama Caxx (below) making her stunning debut appearance on the catwalk at New York Fashion Week.

 

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Thank you @chromat + team for allowing me to grace your runway once more. Thanks to everyone who oiled me 😂- Such an amazing show , the collection explores human’s contribution to the destruction of our planet. A collection made with recycled plastic bottles, discarded fishnets and upcycled fabrics. Diversity and inclusion has always been the root of Chromat now taking a bigger step towards sustainable fashion. . I could have sworn I was smiling but apparently I was focusing on not falling but I did spot @missjulee in the crowd and even winked at her. So happy I got to see @jillianmercado @chellaman @maryvbenoit @denisebidot after the show.☺️😚😚 . Thanks for the love and support y’all 📷 : @voguerunway . #abishcantevenwalkyettheygotherwalkingtherunway #callmebambi #beckywiththeoneleg ____________________________________________

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At Good On You, we’re celebrating all women on March the 8th, so without further ado, here are some top ethical brands that pride themselves on featuring different races, sizes and cultures in their models and editorials:

Girlfriend Collective

Rated: Good

The Girlfriend Collective is a women’s clothing label defining what slow fashion really stands for, with their innovative use of materials and their top working standards. Their clothing utilises recycled materials, including water bottles and fishing nets, which make for great alternatives to virgin nylon (and a great way to marry sustainability and recycling through your clothing!). The materials and styles of their garments look great on all shapes and sizes, with the Collective stocking clothing to fit sizes XXS to 6XL. Their activewear is especially appealing with colourful shades and flattering cuts. This label is all about inclusion and transparency, for the planet and all women.

HARA

Rated: Great

Hara, meaning green in Hindi, is a clear motto that runs through this label. Hara’s vision to bring change and awareness to the issues of the fashion industry is evident in their approach, and the quality and care across the label. The unique, minimal and vibrantly coloured pieces feature models with diverse body shapes and race across their catalogue. For an underwear brand, this level of diversity is quite rare, and it is refreshing to see such an open approach to women and their bodies while maintaining the highest standards of ethics and sustainability.

Shop HARA The Label

Kirrin Finch

Rated: Great

Colored shirts and and smart casual attire never looked so cool, on all genders. Kirin Finch embrace diversity, with the basis of their business being to support the LGBTQI community and women. They are innovative in their approach to the usual shirt and pant combo in that they cater to women and non-binary people, with the desire to make menswear-inspired apparel more accessible to those who love it.

All their shirts are made from natural fabrics and use low impact dyes, adding their minimal impact on their workers, and the planet.

Yevu

Rated: Good

This sustainable, ethical social enterprise has a big, meaningful mission: to change the circumstances for vulnerable women in the informal sector of Ghana, West Africa. Their handmade clothing comes from safe, nurturing working environments are where Yevu are transforming and empowering women to be economically independent and secure. Their online platform showcases every aspect of their production process, with extensive information about the people behind the clothing how they help each other through the process.

Yevu collections are always a vibrant and stand out series of jumpsuits and dresses for women and shorts and coloured shirts for men, to name a few things. To further add to their diversity repertoire, Yevu do shorter partnerships, like recently with Avenue Australia, to work with people with disabilities to provide training in Ecommerce and show them how Yevu functions as a business. Amazing things happening in this space, with many more to come!

The Social Outfit

Rated: Great

For The Social Outfit, diversity is in their DNA. The Social Enterprise supports women refugees and migrants through free access to their studio space and workshops. Their engagement with the multicultural community has made them a stand out in the fashion industry. Their collections are often funky, vibrant patterns that come in various styles that suit all bodies and occasions. Stemming from their business model and approach to women and the fashion industry, their ethically made pieces are worn by models from all different racial backgrounds.

Editor's note: Feature image by Kirrin Finch, other images by brands mentioned. Good On You has big plans for ethical fashion in 2019! To support our work, we may earn a commission on sales made using our offers code or affiliate links.

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